Walking a Chihuahua: What Pet Columnists Suggest You Do and Avoid

Those of us who are blessed to be in their company know how hard it is walking a Chihuahua. Even though they are little cuties, most of them have a strong temperament that’s not quite easy to handle. While on the lookout for some tips on making this process enjoyable for both parties, we came across a nice columnist at Modbee. A woman looking for advice wrote as follows. “I have an 11-week-old Chihuahua mix puppy that refuses to walk on a leash. I may get her moving for two or three steps, but then she puts on the brakes and refuses to budge. Should I just be carrying her everywhere until she decides to walk on her own?” – Kayla.

The Do’s and Dont’s of Walking a Chihuahua Lisa Moore, the columnist, went on to answer that Kayla was right to an extent. Even though leash walking seems so basic to us, first-time experiences for a puppy can be a bit overwhelming. Remember that leash walking is an activity you will likely want to repeat for the next 10 years. That’s why it makes sense to intr

oduce it positively from the beginning to ensure success in the future.

According to Lisa, the main mistake owners of small breeds make is carrying their little ones around. After all, it is faster and easier, to the point that they are never leash trained. This can be a problem down the road. As she explains, a good way to introduce a puppy to a leash and collar is to begin in the home. You ought to choose a soft material for a collar and an equally lightweight leash. You can begin by leaving both on the floor for the puppy to explore on her own. After that brief introductory period, you should place the collar on her in the house and let her wear it. You may face some difficulties at first, but it’s

important to keep on moving forward. Once she has adjusted to wearing the collar, which may take a few minutes or days, attach the lightweight leash to it, and let it just drag around behind her as she moves through the house. As she becomes more mobile and confident while wearing the lightweight leash and collar, with you following along handing out goodies, begin to encourage her to walk with you in a new direction. At this point, you become the leader instead of the follower.

Walking Out into The Real World When it’s time to take your moves outside, be prepared to go slowly again. Although she should be comfortable walking with you on a leash, now the presence of everything in the world is there to grab her attention. You should limit her exposure to areas outside of her home where other pets have access at this stage due to her not being fully immunized. So carry her if you are at the park or the vet’s office. In public areas where dogs do not travel, put her down and practice walking a few steps at a time. As Lisa explains, the more you get used to walking a Chihuahua around, the more comfortable she’ll get, so be patient. Let her explore and give her the time she needs; just be sure to end the practice before she gets tired. It will pay off big time, and in the future, you and your puppy can walk for miles together.