BAD BREATH IN CHIHUAHUAS: CAUSES AND CURES

Simple chronic halitosis. Whether we’re talking humans or pets, bad breath is a big deal. It’s a stinky problem, but take heart. In most cases there’s a lot you can do to keep bad breath at bay.

Causes: There are a variety of causes for bad breath in pets, these include:

1. Periodontal disease It’s by far the most common cause of bad breath in pets. Studies show that after the age of 3 years, 80 percent of dogs and cats will have signs of periodontal disease. The cause of the offensive odor in these cases is the bacteria that coalesce as plaque and cause irritating gingivitis. As plaque matures and periodontal disease progresses, more destructive bacteria come into play. Periodontal disease is a painful condition that can lead to tooth loss and damage to organs like the heart and kidneys.

2. Teething Kittens and puppies often have sick breath when they are teething. Kittens, especially, seem prone to the problem, which typically lasts only a couple of months. What happens is that bacteria collects at the gum line as baby teeth are edged out by budding adult teeth.

3. Oral disease In addition to gum disease a host of other oral diseases can cause bad breath. These include stomatitis, a common feline condition that causes painful inflammation of the gums and mouth tissues; oral masses, which include both cancerous and benign growths; and gingival hyperplasia, a condition in which the gums overgrow, creating bumps and deep crevices where bacteria proliferate.

4. Gastrointestinal disease If the esophagus, stomach, or intestines are sick, they can make for stinky breath. It’s a far less common reason for halitosis than periodontal disease, however.

5. Metabolic disease Diseases that affect the body’s metabolic balance or allow for the presence of abnormal levels of certain toxins in the blood can yield impressive mouth odours. Kidney disease is the most well-known of these. The end-stage process called uremia causes a characteristically sour-smelling breath.

What To Do at Home Taking an active role in your pet’s dental care can help keep foul breath under control.

1. Brush your pet’ s teeth All pets — dogs and cats alike — should be trained early on to accept simple tooth brushing as part of their daily (at the very least, weekly) routine.

2. Plaque-reducing treats Plaque-reducing treats Can be helpful, but they are not all created equal. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation.

3. Water additives Water additives promise fresh breath, but do they deliver? It seems some do. Ask your veterinarian for advice before buying the first kind you spy in the pet store.

What Your Veterinarian May Do: When you take your pet to the vet, here are things the doctor may do:

1. History Most veterinarians will start by asking a few questions to understand the history of the bad breath. When did you first notice it? Has it changed? How has you pet been otherwise?

2. Physical examination Examining the whole body, not just the mouth, is a crucial part of the process. The oral examination, however, is by far the most important aspect of bad breath

assessment.

3. Anesthetic evaluation Unfortunately, a thorough assessment of a pet’s oral cavity is almost always impossible without sedation or anesthesia. Once the pet is sedated, each individual tooth can be probed, x-rays can be taken, and other structures in the mouth can be examined.

4. Dental cleaning Dental cleaning is indispensable when combatting bad breath. That’s because ridding the teeth (and area under the gum line) of plaque bacteria goes a long way toward improving the health of the teeth and gums, and therefore treating bad breath.

5. Biopsy It may sometimes be necessary to obtain a sample of apparently abnormal tissue to determine its origins before definitive treatment can be initiated. This tends to be the case when oral masses are involved.

Treatment: Treatment of halitosis depends wholly on the underlying cause. Because most halitosis is born of periodontal disease, treatment for bad breath tends to rely heavily on at-home care in addition to professional dental cleanings. Talk with your vet about what is the best action plan for your pet.

Reference: www.vetstreet.com/my-pet-has-bad-breath-whats-happening-to-cause-it

This article was written by a Veterinarian

CHIHUAHUA PUPPY TRIES TO SLEEP

This Chihuahua Puppy Trying To Fall Asleep On Her Sister Will Melt Your Heart!
Cocoa the Chihuahua is desperate for some shut-eye, she can barely keep her eyes open! Her and her sister are on puppy steps; her sister is asleep on the top step and Cocoa is on the step below. All Cocoa wants to do is rest her head on her sister but every time she closes her eyes and starts to fall asleep, her head begins sliding off.

But Cocoa is very persistent and doesn’t give up. Every time her head starts to slip off, she re-positions it back onto her sister. After an entire minute of trying, she finally accepts the fact that it just wont work and she goes to sleep on her own step. A for effort though, and for being undeniably adorable!
But Cocoa is very persistent and doesn’t give up. Every time her head starts to slip off, she re-positions it back onto her sister. After an entire minute of trying, she finally accepts the fact that it just wont work and she goes to sleep on her own step. A for effort though, and for being undeniably adorable!

HOW CIGARETTE SMOKE AFFECTS YOUR CHIHUAHUA

Secondhand smoke isn’t just a health threat to people. It can also hurt dogs and cats, veterinarians say.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 126 million Americans who don’t smoke are exposed to secondhand smoke in their homes, vehicles, workplaces, and public places. This exposure causes thousands of lung cancer and heart disease deaths among nonsmokers every year, according to the California Environmental Protection Agency.

Making the leap from the effects of secondhand smoke on humans to their effects on pets isn’t a big one, says veterinarian Carolynn MacAllister of Oklahoma State University.

“There have been a number of scientific papers recently that have reported the significant health threat secondhand smoke poses to pets,” MacAllister said. “Secondhand smoke has been associated with oral cancer and lymphoma in cats, lung and nasal cancer in dogs, as well as lung cancer in birds.”

Mouth cancer in cats MacAllister cited a study done by the Tufts College of Veterinary Medicine that showed that the number of cats living with mouth cancer (also known as squamous cell carcinoma) was higher for those living in homes with smokers than those who lived in smoke-free environments.

“One reason cats are so susceptible to secondhand smoke is because of their grooming habits,” MacAllister said. “Cats constantly lick themselves while grooming, therefore they lick up the cancer-causing carcinogens that accumulate on their fur. This grooming behavior exposes the mucous membranes of their mouth to the cancer-causing carcinogens.”

Cats living with smokers are also twice as likely to develop malignant lymphoma, a cancer that occurs in the lymph nodes and that is fatal to three out of four cats within 12 months of developing it.

Lung and nose cancer in dogs Studies have also shown that dogs living in a smoking household are susceptible to cancers of the nose and sinus area, particularly if they are a long-nosed breed, because their noses have a greater surface area that is exposed to carcinogens and a greater area for them to accumulate. Dogs affected with nasal cancer normally don’t survive for more than one year.

Short and medium-nosed dogs are more susceptible to lung cancer, “because their shorter nasal passage aren’t as effective at accumulating the inhaled secondhand smoke carcinogens,” MacAllister said. “This results in more carcinogens reaching the lungs.”

Birds are also at risk for lung cancer, as well as pneumonia, because their respiratory systems are hypersensitive to any type of air pollutant.

To help prevent animals from being adversely affected by smoking, pet owners who smoke should have a designated smoking area that is separated from the home or stop smoking altogether, MacAllister said.

By Andrea Thompson

Reference: www.livescience.com/7378-secondhand-smoke-cancer-pets.html

Grooming Your Chihuahua

Chihuahuas are an amazing breed, famous for being recognized as the smallest breed of dog, with puppies able to be laid in the palm of a hand. As a former dog groomer, I do have some knowledge in the pet grooming arena. Do Chihuahuas Need Grooming? Compared to some other breeds, Chihuahuas do not need as much grooming.But they still need to be groomed. All dogs do.Chihuahuas are tiny and low to the ground.

Because of that, they are more susceptible to picking up dirt, dust and mud that can collect in their fur along with being more prone to fleas. How Often Should Chihuahuas Be Groomed? It can depend on several things including:Their environment How much time they spend outside
The weather Whether they are long haired or short haired chis If they have skin issues If they have flea issues I groom my dogs once a month. We have what I call a spa day where I groom all 3 of them. Not their favorite thing in the world to do, but they tolerate it. Is Grooming the Same as Bathing? No, not necessarily.Grooming your dog will include a bath but it also may include clipping their hair, trimming their nails and cleaning their ears out. Most dogs only need grooming once a month but may need a bath more often, like every other week. What Supplies You Need to Groom Your Chihuahu Dog Shampoo Dog Conditioner (optional) Squeeze bottle (optional) wash cloth Several large towels ,Several small towels Silicone baking mat for bottom of sink (optional) Nail Clippers or Nail Grinder Styptic powder Dog Clippers A few Cotton BallsEar Cleaner Hair Cutting Scissors (for long hair chis) Dog Hair Clippers (for long hair chis) Dog Brush Steps to

Grooming a Chihuahua If you have a long hair chihuahua, there are some further steps lower down in this post but below are the basic steps to groom a dog. First, get all your supplies out.Put the bathing supplies by the sink (or wherever you plan to bathe your dog) and the rest of the supplies where you will do the other grooming tasks. Speaking of bath supplies (I learned this from my grooming days), this trick will help control where the shampoo goes on your dog: Use a clean plastic squirt bottle (you can buy one or recycle a used dish detergent bottle) and pour about a teaspoon’s worth of dog shampoo into the bottle. Add some warm water to the bottle and shake well. When I groom one of my dogs, I place a fluffy towel down on one of my kitchen counters to do the work before the bath. The towel keeps the dog from sliding, it’s more comfortable for them and catches the hair and the clipped nail parts. Kitchen counters aren’t as good as having an actual grooming table (I used to have a professional grooming table but sold it as I didn’t have the room to store it) but the counter is high enough to work comfortably without stooping over. Nails Regarding the feet, it’s important to keep your Chihuahua’s nails trimmed once a month at least. When their nails get too long your Chi will have trouble staying out of its own way and inhibit their ability to walk. Eventually it could cause bone deformities and also cause a lot of pain so please don’t ignore their nails. Chihuahuas can be a bit ornery when it comes to their paws so you may have trouble with getting them to settle down enough to trim their nails correctly. Thus, it might be a good idea to take your pet to a professional groomer or a veterinarian rather than skip clipping their nails. Or have someone help you to hold them. Clip your dogs nails or use a nail grinder. If you use nail clips, make sure they are sharp. Have some styptic powder on hand in case you cut the nail too close and it starts to bleed.Just dip the nail in the powder and it will stop the bleeding. While doing your dog’s nails, check for infections of the foot and dirt and rocks that can collect in between their paws. Ears Fortunately for chihuahuas, since most of them have erect ears, they don’t deal with ear infections as often as floppy eared breeds do. But they still can get them. So use this opportunity to check for a foul smell, redness, puffiness,

greasiness or brown specks. All of this could be a sign of an ear infection. Even if the ears look fine they still need a little care. You can click the link to I use my kitchen sink to bathe my pups. That’s one of the great things about having small dogs. It’s so easy to bathe them. Make sure the sink is clean and clear of anything close that your dog can knock over such as dish soap or dirty dishes or whatever. If you have a silicone baking mat, place it in the bottom to keep your dog from sliding. If you don’t have a mat, you can place a small towel there. Fill the sink with a few inches of warm water. Make sure the water isn’t too hot or too cool before you put your fur kid in it. The face is usually the hardest to wash, so start there first. Pour a little of your shampoo mixture on a wet washcloth and gently wipe your dog’s face with it. Rinse out your washcloth and go over the face again with just the wet washcloth to remove any of the shampoo residue. Using your squirt bottle, squirt your shampoo mixture starting at the back of the head and squirt all the way to the tail. Work up a lather and then squirt the shampoo on your dogs legs and feet. Lather them up too. Now, squirt and lather your dog’s chest, tummy, genitals and anal area and lather those areas. Now rinse your dog thoroughly with warm water until the there are no suds left. Try not to get water in your dog’s ears as this can cause an ear infection.You can add a conditioner if you want and leave it on a few minutes before rinsing off. After they are done with the bath, wrap them in a thick towel and towel dry. How to Groom a Long Hair Chihuahua Grooming a long hair chihuahua is basically the same as grooming a short hair chihuahua with a few added steps. Give your dog a thorough brushing and get as many mats out as possible. You have 2 choices if your dog’s hair is matted:You can shave them or you can de-mat them. Here’s a video of how to de-mat them and you will need this tool.

Should you Spay or Neuter your Chihuahua?

Chill Out! How to Help Your Stressed-Out Chihuahua In today’s world, many of us dog owners have high-stress lifestyles – the demands of work, home, and family can really ramp up our anxiety level. What about our dogs, however – is it possible for our Chihuahuas to experience anxiety like we do?

The simple answer, of course, is yes. It’s true that many breeds are far more unflappable than our little friends. Chihuahuas in particular seem to be known for their nervous tendencies, and just like their human counterparts, our stressed out pups may worry about a number of different things. In some cases, the anxiety is so severe that it can affect our family routines or our relationships with our Chihuahuas; sometimes causing us to be worried, overprotective, upset, angry or even resentful of our pup’s behavior. And just as with people, constant anxiety might even have a worrisome effect on your little friend’s health, increasing their cortisol (stress hormone) levels and making their immune system less effective when they’re fighting illness. Every dog can show their anxiety in different ways, and it’s up to us to do some detective work if we notice that our Chis are acting differently. Shaking or trembling is a pretty typical behavior trait we notice in our diminutive dogs when they’re uneasy, but there are some other signs that might tip you off to the fact that your Chihuahua is too stressed out such as: A change in their appetite – yes, our friends tend to be picky eaters as a rule, but sometimes they’re not eating because they’re actually anxious • Weight loss or other health issues

• Unusually quiet or even depressed • Destructive behaviors like chewing on furniture or clothing • Increased whining, whimpering or barking • Clinginess • Reluctance to potty in their normal spot, or peeing and pooping in the house suddenly • Licking or chewing at themselves – compulsive grooming can often release endorphins (feel-good hormones), so some Chihuahuas may repeatedly lick or chew at their skin and fur to help relieve their anxious feelings • Aggressive behavior – it’s not unusual for a stressed or fearful dog to lash out in defense, or to physically redirect their feelings onto the closest target if they’re feeling extremely nervous Sometimes, it’s easy for us to see what’s upsetting our dogs, like the presence of scary noises or the fear of being separated from us. At other times, though, we might have no idea what’s causing our pups to quiver in misery – it’s not like they can tell us in words, exactly! Because we know that it’s far from fun to be always stressed out, it is important to get to the bottom of the issue that’s bothering your Chihuahua. To begin with, let’s take a quick look at some of the reasons why many of our little dogs might be stressed: • Separation from their owner or other animal friend – Chis tend to bond very closely with their families. • Boredom – Our smart little pooches need lots of interaction and play to give them enough mental stimulation. • Not enough physical activity – though small, Chis still need lots of exercise! • Fear – Especially if they’ve been poorly socialized, or have had a traumatic experience previously, Chihuahuas might be stressed out by new people, different environments, loud or unusual noises, and even other dogs or pets. • Changes in routine – Dogs are creatures of habit, and if we could actually talk to them, most of them would say they prefer a fairly predictable daily routine. This is an instinctual remnant from their wolfish ancestors – consistency in food source and shelter meant a greater rate of survival! • Health problems or chronic pain – it’s never fun being sick, and a Chi who’s feeling crummy all the time can definitely feel upset and anxious. • Losing a family member (human or animal) –Chihuahuas are little dogs with big hearts; it’s not uncommon for them to grieve after losing a close companion.

The good news is that there are many ways in which you can lend a helping paw to your anxious pup. To begin with, it’s always a good idea to have them fully examined by their veterinarian to help rule out any medical problems that could be causing their stress. Next, taking steps to enrich your Chihuahua’s day-to-day routine can go a long way towards lowering their stress level! Feeding a high-quality and nutritious diet, providing fresh water, and giving your pup a comfortable and secure place to rest (without fear of interruption) are great ways to keep them physically healthy, but your time and attention is important to your pup too. Make sure that your Chihuahua is getting lots of exercise from daily walks or backyard playtime, and give their brain a workout as well with interactive toys, obedience training, teaching fun tricks, or even games of ‘hide and seek’ or ‘find the treat’. We already know that our Chis welcome love and affection in large supply, but remember to avoid harsh corrections or punishment too, which can only make anxiety worse.

For some Chihuahuas, simply giving them more of our time can make a huge difference in how they feel; for others, however, the chronic cycle of stress and anxiety can be impossible to relieve without help, particularly in cases of severe separation anxiety, extreme under-socialization or fear caused by a really dire event. For these dogs, a program of slow and careful behavior modification supervised by a veterinary behaviorist is often the best option for recovery and relief. Occasionally, veterinarian prescribed anti-anxiety medications are an option for relieving severe anxiety too, which helps with behavior training and conditioning, allowing a dog to become calm enough to be able to experience certain situations without feeling constant stress. It’s true that there’s often no quick and easy solution to treating your Chihuahua’s anxiety, but that doesn’t mean it should merely be brushed off as ‘just a Chihuahua thing’. Emotional stress is a serious problem for many of our pups, and as their loving owners, we need to step forward and help them through it. After all, aren’t they always there for us? So, is your Chihuahua stressed out and anxious? Do you know why? Have you tried anything to to help your Chi with his/her stress? Did it work? Let us know in the comments!

Anxiety in Chihuahuas

Chill Out! How to Help Your Stressed-Out Chihuahua In today’s world, many of us dog owners have high-stress lifestyles – the demands of work, home, and family can really ramp up our anxiety level. What about our dogs, however – is it possible for our Chihuahuas to experience anxiety like we do?

The simple answer, of course, is yes. It’s true that many breeds are far more unflappable than our little friends. Chihuahuas in particular seem to be known for their nervous tendencies, and just like their human counterparts, our stressed out pups may worry about a number of different things. In some cases, the anxiety is so severe that it can affect our family routines or our relationships with our Chihuahuas; sometimes causing us to be worried, overprotective, upset, angry or even resentful of our pup’s behavior. And just as with people, constant anxiety might even have a worrisome effect on your little friend’s health, increasing their cortisol (stress hormone) levels and making their immune system less effective when they’re fighting illness. Every dog can show their anxiety in different ways, and it’s up to us to do some detective work if we notice that our Chis are acting differently. Shaking or trembling is a pretty typical behavior trait we notice in our diminutive dogs when they’re uneasy, but there are some other signs that might tip you off to the fact that your Chihuahua is too stressed out such as: A change in their appetite – yes, our friends tend to be picky eaters as a rule, but sometimes they’re not eating because they’re actually anxious • Weight loss or other health issues

• Unusually quiet or even depressed • Destructive behaviors like chewing on furniture or clothing • Increased whining, whimpering or barking • Clinginess • Reluctance to potty in their normal spot, or peeing and pooping in the house suddenly • Licking or chewing at themselves – compulsive grooming can often release endorphins (feel-good hormones), so some Chihuahuas may repeatedly lick or chew at their skin and fur to help relieve their anxious feelings • Aggressive behavior – it’s not unusual for a stressed or fearful dog to lash out in defense, or to physically redirect their feelings onto the closest target if they’re feeling extremely nervous Sometimes, it’s easy for us to see what’s upsetting our dogs, like the presence of scary noises or the fear of being separated from us. At other times, though, we might have no idea what’s causing our pups to quiver in misery – it’s not like they can tell us in words, exactly! Because we know that it’s far from fun to be always stressed out, it is important to get to the bottom of the issue that’s bothering your Chihuahua. To begin with, let’s take a quick look at some of the reasons why many of our little dogs might be stressed: • Separation from their owner or other animal friend – Chis tend to bond very closely with their families. • Boredom – Our smart little pooches need lots of interaction and play to give them enough mental stimulation. • Not enough physical activity – though small, Chis still need lots of exercise! • Fear – Especially if they’ve been poorly socialized, or have had a traumatic experience previously, Chihuahuas might be stressed out by new people, different environments, loud or unusual noises, and even other dogs or pets. • Changes in routine – Dogs are creatures of habit, and if we could actually talk to them, most of them would say they prefer a fairly predictable daily routine. This is an instinctual remnant from their wolfish ancestors – consistency in food source and shelter meant a greater rate of survival! • Health problems or chronic pain – it’s never fun being sick, and a Chi who’s feeling crummy all the time can definitely feel upset and anxious. • Losing a family member (human or animal) –Chihuahuas are little dogs with big hearts; it’s not uncommon for them to grieve after losing a close companion.

The good news is that there are many ways in which you can lend a helping paw to your anxious pup. To begin with, it’s always a good idea to have them fully examined by their veterinarian to help rule out any medical problems that could be causing their stress. Next, taking steps to enrich your Chihuahua’s day-to-day routine can go a long way towards lowering their stress level! Feeding a high-quality and nutritious diet, providing fresh water, and giving your pup a comfortable and secure place to rest (without fear of interruption) are great ways to keep them physically healthy, but your time and attention is important to your pup too. Make sure that your Chihuahua is getting lots of exercise from daily walks or backyard playtime, and give their brain a workout as well with interactive toys, obedience training, teaching fun tricks, or even games of ‘hide and seek’ or ‘find the treat’. We already know that our Chis welcome love and affection in large supply, but remember to avoid harsh corrections or punishment too, which can only make anxiety worse.

For some Chihuahuas, simply giving them more of our time can make a huge difference in how they feel; for others, however, the chronic cycle of stress and anxiety can be impossible to relieve without help, particularly in cases of severe separation anxiety, extreme under-socialization or fear caused by a really dire event. For these dogs, a program of slow and careful behavior modification supervised by a veterinary behaviorist is often the best option for recovery and relief. Occasionally, veterinarian prescribed anti-anxiety medications are an option for relieving severe anxiety too, which helps with behavior training and conditioning, allowing a dog to become calm enough to be able to experience certain situations without feeling constant stress. It’s true that there’s often no quick and easy solution to treating your Chihuahua’s anxiety, but that doesn’t mean it should merely be brushed off as ‘just a Chihuahua thing’. Emotional stress is a serious problem for many of our pups, and as their loving owners, we need to step forward and help them through it. After all, aren’t they always there for us? So, is your Chihuahua stressed out and anxious? Do you know why? Have you tried anything to to help your Chi with his/her stress? Did it work? Let us know in the comments!

Vision Loss in Chihuahuas

My Chihuahua Kilo still sees just fine, but several years ago, I noticed my aging terri-poo Joey was having problems seeing things. The Vet said he had Glaucoma, and nothing could really be done for it. So, we adjusted. And Joey did adjust quite well. It turns out, vision is not a dog’s dominant sense like it is for humans. Vision loss or blindness in dogs can be a congenital condition, or it can develop during your pet’s life. Trauma or infections can be the cause of acute vision loss; on the other hand, progressive diseases such as cataracts, retinal degeneration, and glaucoma may cause chronic vision loss. Chronic vision loss is common in old dogs; however, in some cases, it is not detected because pet parents attribute their clumsiness and disorientation to age and not to failing eyesight. Vision loss can potentially occur in any canine, regardless of breed. However, many cases of blindness are thought to be genetic and breed or age-specific, for example, white dogs, such as white Boxers and Great Danes have a greater prevalence of blindness. Chihuahua dogs are susceptible to blindness due to progressive retinal atrophy. Signs Of Vision Loss Pet parents must know the signs of vision loss so that they can provide their dogs with the necessary medical attention. Since many different eye conditions can cause vision loss, any sign of ocular disease should be taken seriously to prevent blindness. Some signs of eye disease are: Eye inflammation Ocular discharge

Color changes (e.g., cloudy or discolored eyes) Eyeballs enlargement Constant rubbing of the eyes Squinting Lethargy Chronic blindness can be harder to detect; however, in these cases, the patients have better chances of compensating vision loss with other senses. Some signs of progressive vision loss are: General disorientation Misjudging heights and bumping into walls, furniture, or other objects Confusion in new surroundings Reluctance to move Difficulty finding food and water bowls Causes of Vision Loss Eye problems, such as sudden vision loss in dogs, can be attributed to many causes. Any disease that blocks light from reaching the retina or that causes significant damage to the cornea, retina, or other eye structures can cause blindness. Causes of vision loss in dogs include: Cataracts Glaucoma Uveitis Trauma Ulcers Lens luxation Retinal detachment Retinal degeneration Progressive retinal atrophy Diabetes mellitus Brain lesions Intoxications (e.g., ivermectin and lead) Untreated eye infections Cancer Entropion (the tendency of the eyelids to roll inwards) Collie eye anomaly Dry eye syndrome Retinal pigment epithelial dystrophy Progressive retinal atrophy is a group of degenerative illnesses that affect mostly Chihuahuas, Labradors, Poodles, and Cocker Spaniels. If your Chihuahua is losing vision, this could be the cause, and you should seek veterinary attention immediately.

Treatments Some eye diseases, such as glaucoma, cause irreversible vision loss; however, other causes, such as cataracts, lead to a reversible vision loss that can be corrected with surgery. Prevention is very important; therefore, pet parents should not let eye infections untreated, and a veterinarian should investigate any signs of diabetes or eye disease.

What Pet Parents Can Do To Ease The Life Of A Blind Dog Dogs with impaired vision can learn to have a normal life. We should remember that vision is not the most developed sense in dogs; they rely on other senses like smell and hearing to accomplish their daily activities. When a dog loses sight, especially when this occurs progressively, he/she can compensate with other senses and live a fairly normal life. Here are some things that you can do to help your blind dog: Do not leave your dog unleashed in an unfamiliar place Avoid moving furniture in your house Walk your dog on a leash Announce your presence when approaching your dog whistling or clapping your hands softly Keep food and water bowls in the same area Get your blind dog, a sighted dog companion Spend as much time as possible with your dog Consider getting a Muffin’s Halo for your dog. You can read about it and order one here. Amazon also has them here. Signs of Worsening Vision Problems As you can see, there are many signs of vision loss in dogs. However, as a dog owner, you may want to familiarize yourself with the signs that may point to a worsening vision problem.

Dogs won’t let their owner know that they are starting to lose their vision, which is why knowing what to look for is so important.

Can’t See Toys or Treats Your dog’s vision problems may becoming progressively worse if you toss them a treat or toy, and they don’t see it. In this case, it is important to also test their peripheral vision. To do this, toss the treat or their favorite toy to the far right and then the far left and watch what your dog does. Do they notice? Won’t Jump Off the Bed or Couch If you notice that your dog is becoming more hesitant about jumping from furniture they used to jump from before or they are more hesitant to use stairs or go out at night, then their vision may be getting worse, and they may also be developing night blindness. Night blindness is also known as senile retinal degeneration and is often age-related. With this condition, your dog has poor vision in dim light environments. Stunned in Sunlight If your Chihuahua dog seems a bit stunned when they are outdoors in the sunlight, it can be a sign of severe cataracts and worsening vision. The pupils will constrict in bright light settings, and the light then passes through the dense and cloudy part of a cataractous lens. Hazards in the Home and Outside If your Chihuahua is experiencing vision loss or other sight problems, you need to be aware of the hazards they may face in the home and outdoors. Never let your pet run around loose outside of a fenced-in area until he knows and is familiar with his surroundings and is becoming adjusted to his sight problems. Keep them on the leash until you are sure that there are no hazards. Make sure all the debris is picked up around the yards as well. This includes equipment, toys, and branches. These all pose tripping hazards for your Chihuahua. The railings on your porch should also be examined. You don’t want to risk your dog falling through and off the porch. If you have a door at ground level, utilize this for letting the dog in and out. Avoid any steps or raised decks until your dog adjusts. You can also attach a bell to the collar of your dog so it will make noise when they run. Recovery from Vision Problems Even if your Chihuahua loses their eyesight, their personality and acceptance of their owner will outshine. They will also be able to use their other senses incredibly well. Don’t panic as your Chihuahua learns how to get around with vision problems. Allow them to find their own way around the home and their environment. You can lead them calmly when necessary and help them overcome obstacles that may be in their way as they learn. Many dogs are already well-trained, and the transition won’t be as difficult as you may think. Some dogs may even recover if they have a positive prognosis from their veterinarian. Sometimes surgery and medication can help for certain conditions and can lead them straight to recovery. However, the best chance for any kind of recovery is the early detection of these vision problems. This means that regular veterinarian visits for your Chihuahua and understanding the signs to watch for are all important for helping your dog stay strong, healthy, and happy, even in the midst of vision problems or uncertainty. So have you had to deal with blindness with your dog? How have you dealt with it? Let us know in the comments!

Chihuahua Blood Sugar Problems

The first time my Chi got “sugar shock,” I was terrified. Here are signs and symptoms to watch for, as well as a few ways to avoid it. What Is Hypoglycemia in Chihuahuas? Chihuahuas, like many small breeds, have trouble regulating their blood sugar. The first time my Chi suffered an episode of low sugar, I really did not know what was wrong. He was 7 months old and had a pretty typical day. Then a short time after playing, he started walking like he was drunk. It was as though he had no control over his legs. He threw up foam and then basically fell over. I was beside myself; how did we go from playing one minute to this scene the next? I have always had at least one dog in my life, but my Chihuahua, Norbit, was my first small breed of dog, and I was not savvy to the hypoglycemia thing. It was on a Sunday, so we wrapped Norbit up in a blanket and went to the emergency vet. They took one look and said my dog had been poisoned. I said that was really impossible, as he literally spent zero time unattended. I knew for certain my dog hadn’t chewed on anything but his toys. Then another vet tech on duty said, “He is in sugar shock.” She had several rescue Chihuahuas at home herself, and she said low blood sugar wasn’t uncommon in small breeds. She put some Karo syrup on a flat wooden stick and he just stared at it glassy-eyed like he had no idea how to lick. So she put roughly a teaspoon of the syrup in a syringe and—while explaining I should never do this at home as he could choke—he gently pushed the syrup right down this throat. He was seriously right as rain in a very short time. It was extremely frightening, however, and I vowed to do my best to keep my dog from ever experiencing this again by learning why it happened and what I could do to prevent it.

What Symptoms Will My Chihuahua Have? In the case of my dog, his low blood sugar was caused by a play session that went on a little too long and too hard. Who can say no when a puppy keeps wanting to play? That was my mistake and I definitely learned from it. I found from talking to my vet that a chihuahua with low blood sugar may: Wobble when either standing or sitting. If laying down your dog may have trouble lifting his head. Your dog may have a blank stare with glassy eyes. Often dogs in sugar shock tilt their heads to one side as if their head is very heavy on one side. As the low blood sugar progresses, your dog may shake badly, drool, and froth at the mouth. Obvious signs of being disoriented. Home Treatment of Hypoglycemia for Your Chihuahua These tips for home treatment are only to get your Chihuahua up and about. Always follow up with your veterinarian. It’s important to make sure there are no other outstanding medical issues that may have the same symptoms as low blood sugar such as tumors, bacterial infections, pancreatic issues, and other serious medical conditions. Feed Your Chi Something Sweet Your goal here is to raise your dog’s blood sugar, so something sweet is in order. You can use honey, Karo syrup, or maple syrup. Also, I’ve used vanilla ice cream. As hypoglycemia can progress quickly and become life-threatening for your pooch, it’s important to act fast.

Note: Whatever method you choose to raise your dog’s sugar level, don’t just put honey in his mouth. He could choke. If he will lick it off your fingers, great. If not, you can rub honey, syrups, or ice cream on your dog’s gums. Be careful, disoriented dogs can bite. If your dog has passed into the severe stage of low blood sugar and is having focal seizures or unconscious, keep rubbing syrup on their gums on the way to the vet; it may be life-saving for your pet. It doesn’t take much. On a few occasions, my 10-lb chihuahua has gone into sugar shock, it’s taken just a couple of teaspoons of honey to bring him around. Give Them Regular Food as Soon as Possible After your dog becomes alert, he should eat as soon as possible so his blood sugar can become stable. You can give your dog regular food or treats; whatever you can get him interested in eating is fine. Note: If your pup seems reluctant to eat, you can add a little honey or ice cream to their bowl to entice them to eat. Last Word About Low Blood Sugar and Your Chihuahua You can almost entirely avoid bouts of hypoglycemia by feeding your dog regularly and according to Dr. Greg Martinez DVM, since a lot of commercial dog foods are high in grain products, those foods actually set your dog up for low blood sugar. By switching to low-glycemic dog food, you can help your Chi maintain a more constant sugar level. My vet advised me to feed my dog more than twice a day. So I just took his total amount of food and divided it up into smaller servings and if we do happen to have a play session that he over-exerts himself, and he loves to play hard, I make sure he eats a snack afterward and it’s kept the low blood sugar incidents at bay along with more frequent, smaller meals. Also, if you have a Chihuahua or other small breed, make sure you have honey, Karo syrup, or vanilla ice cream at the ready. My vet also recommended a supplement called Nutri-Cal, which is a high-calorie supplement that provides extra energy. I hope you never have to experience this with your dog, but if you do, now you know how to handle it.

Source: pethelpful

Sleep Under a Blanket?

Chihuahuas like to be warm and cozy. Chihuahuas do not have a lot of body fat (hopefully) and very little hair unless they’re long-hair Chis. Nonetheless, we like to be warm and it’s very cozy under a blanket or two. Completely Hidden It should be perfectly safe for your Chihuahua to sleep under a blanket. It’s what we prefer, especially in Winter. As long as we have a way out, we won’t smother. Believe me, we want to be warm, not suffocated. So many beds, so little time to nap I love to sleep under my blankies. I have several. I also have several beds. My main, nighttime bed is next to my daddies’ big bed. It has high sides and three blankies, so it’s like a tent. I can run whenever I want to escape and can easily get out. also have a bed in my daddy’s home office. When I’m not on his lap or in my night bed, I’m often next to him in my office bed. He covers me with my blankie where I can burrow inside. If it’s too warm I can escape and sleep on top of the blankie.

There’s a pillow I adopted on the sofa. It’s fluffy and comfy. My daddies call it my “tuffet”. I don’t get it. But I often lay there. Although there’s another blankie for me next to the pillow, I have to wait to be covered or do without. This is a lighter blankie. Sometimes when I’m covered up and runoff, the blankie goes with me like a cape. There probably will be a picture of that here, someday. Chihuahuas do not like to be disturbed while sleeping I understand my dad’s previous Chihuahua slept in bed with him and was often completely under the covers. Like me, she got a bit grumpy when you disturbed her while she was sleeping. That’s probably why I have to sleep in my own bed next to the big bed. Also, it’s too high for me to get into and out of. Oh well, I have more freedom this way. Although I do understand they make stairs for Chihuahuas… Source: allmychihuahuas.com

Top 100 Boys and Girls Chihuahua names

Don’t stress out if you haven’t picked a reputation for your Chihuahua yet because we’ve compiled an inventory of the highest 100 boys and girl Chihuahua names and naming tips below. Choosing a reputation for your Chihuahua may be a big decision that should not be taken lightly. After all, it isn’t something you’ll easily change a couple of years down the road if you opt that you simply not love it. Dogs learn through repetition and teaching your Chihuahua their name would require you to talk it dozens of times per day. this is often why it is vital for owners to settle on a meaningful and catchy name to which they will relate. Top 100 Boy Chihuahua Names Top 100 Girl Chihuahua Names Aaron Abby Ace Alley A.J. Angel Alex Annie Ash Athena Ashton Babette Amos Belle Atom Bessie Astro Bina Bailey Bindy Bandit Bitsy Benjamin Blondie Bert Boo Boo Benji Buffy Biscuit Butters Blake Buttercup Boss Candy Benny Caramel Buzz Casey Boo Boo Cassy Bruno CeCe Bruiser Chanel Buttercup Charlie Casper Chloe Chip Chiffon Chico Christina Colt Cinnamon Chief Coco Cash Chrissy Denny Daisy Devil Dakota Ernie Elise Elvis Elle Elroy Emma Felix Evelyn Filo Farrah Fizz Foxy Gizmo Frankie Hero Frenchie Ham Genie Hugo Gigi Handsome Ginger Iggy Giselle Ice Goldilocks Jag Gucci Jaden Gumdrop Kenju Havana King Hermes Kong Honey Kaine Hope Lasher Indigo Lad Ivy Lucky Jasmine Louie Juliet Lion Justice Max Karma Mini Lexi Mack Lexus Might Lilac Night Lilly Ninja Lola Nitro Lolita Oppie Lucy Oliver Lulu Oscar Mariachi Otis Martini Peanut Mary Jane Paw-Paw Mercedes Popeye Mocha Paine Mona Lisa Pie-Boy Monroe Prancer Muffin Pup Paris Quincy Peaches Ranger Peanut Ralph Penelope Rover Penny Rebel Pinkie Ringo Piper Rex Polly Rhino Princess Slasher Queenie Socks Rainbow Scooter Sadie Stevie Sienna Sesame Simone Spots Skittles Scooby Stella Tiny Sugar Tick Sweet Pea Teenie Tahiti Thor Tequila Tackle Tinkerbell Thrasher Tippy Tom-Tom Tulip Tango Twinkie Woogie Venti Waffle Visa Zeb Yasmine Ziggy Zoey Names supported Your Chihuahua’s Personality Chihuahuas are well-known for his or her unique personality and characteristics. If you would like to require full advantage of this, consider naming your Chihuahua something associated with his or her personality. Doing so is that the perfect thanks to letting the planet know just what sort of dog they’re. If your Chihuahua features a funny or unique personality (which most of them do!), then you should not have a drag finding a reputation to suit them. for instance, if your Chihuahua likes to pounce on their toys, you’ll name them “Tiger.”